Atomic Blonde

From LGBT Fiction Guide
Jump to: navigation, search
Atomic-blonde-poster.jpg
Title Atomic Blonde
Premiere 2017
IMDB IMDB
Purchase [ Available on Amazon]

Atomic Blonde is a 2017 spy thriller film set in 1989 on the eve of the collapse of the Berlin Wall and based on Antony Johnston and Sam Hart's 2012 graphic novel, The Coldest City.

LGBT Representation

May contain spoilers


The main character, Lorraine Broughton (Charlize Theron), is bisexual and has a sexual relationship with another woman, Delphine Lasalle (Sofia Boutella).

In an interview with Variety, Theron discussed her character's bisexuality:

"I just loved it. For so many reasons: My frustration of how that community is represented in cinema, or lack thereof. And also, it made perfect sense. It just suited her. It just felt there was a way through that relationship and the fact that it was a same-sex relationship to show a woman not having to fall in love, which is one of those female tropes. 'It's a woman; she better fall in love — otherwise, she's a whore!'"[1]

Theron also addressed her character's bisexuality in an interview on "Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen", stating that she believes it is important that bisexuality is reflected on screen:

"It should be normalized by now. It's something that I feel is not represented enough in cinema, and I feel that when you make movies, if you're going to hold that mirror up and reflect society, then you should reflect society."[2]

Trailer

References

  1. http://variety.com/2017/film/features/charlize-theron-atomic-blonde-female-action-stars-1202489664/
  2. http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/charlize-theron-explains-important-atomic-blonde-character-bisexual/story?id=48814752


Share Your Thoughts

If this is your first time commenting here, please read our Comment Policy. The main points:

  1. No deliberately malicious, abusive, or hateful comments, including but not limited to homophobia, transphobia, biphobia, acephobia, racism, misogyny, outing, doxing, or personal attacks.
  2. Include a trigger warning at the top of your comment if you are discussing potentially triggering topics such as gay bashing, rape, or suicide.


LGBTfiction.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Learn more