Natasha Romanoff

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Natasha Romanoff (Black Widow) is a character in Marvel Comics and films. She is played by Scarlett Johansson in the films.

Sexuality

Romanoff is listed as bisexual on the Marvel Comics wiki[1]. However, like most wikis, the wiki is user edited, so Natasha's inclusion should not be taken as an official statement about her sexuality, especially considering the lack of evidence in comics or films supporting the claim. Natasha is most likely included on the basis of two same-sex kisses in the comics, but both kisses occurred for practical reasons, not as a result of sexual or romantic desire on the part of either female character, so it seems premature to claim her as an example of bisexual representation in the comics or films, especially considering that her canon love interests, including Clint Barton and Bucky Barnes, have all been male.

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Fandom

Of course, the lack of evidence for any same-sex desires in canon hasn't stopped fandom from writing Natasha as queer. Although the most popular ships for Natasha are het, including pairing her with her canonical (in the comics) love interests Clint Barton and Bucky Barnes, as well as Steve Rogers (who is not one of her canonical love interests in the main Marvel universe in comics or films but with whom she had a son named James Rogers in the alternate universe Earth-555326), she is also shipped in several of Marvel's most popular femslash ships, including Natasha Romanoff/Pepper Potts and Natasha Romanoff/Maria Hill. Another popular fanon characterization for Natasha is to make her asexual and/or aromantic.

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References

  1. http://marvel.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Bisexual_Characters


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